Housing

Undergraduate Housing

At the undergraduate level, MIT is a residential university. Of the total undergraduate student body of 4,512, about 3,300 single men and women live in a residence hall on campus, and about 1,100 single men and women take advantage of living in MIT-approved fraternities, sororities, and independent living group residences (FSILGs). Transfer students may be able to obtain housing on a space-available basis after the housing lottery for first-year students is complete.

The residential system provides an environment conducive to personal development and academic achievement. The achievement of both goals relies greatly on individual initiative and responsibility, as well as on effective student governance in the residences. Students work with the professional staff in the offices of Residential Life and Dining to support and create conditions that enhance student learning and personal development.

Faculty families chosen for their understanding of and interest in students live in each of the Institute residence halls as heads of house. They are not charged with formal academic or operational responsibilities; instead, they welcome informal associations with their residents. Area directors reside in most of our undergraduate residences as a support person for the students. They are charged with programmatic responsibilities and are on call for any concerns in the evenings and weekends. In all of the Institute residence halls, graduate resident tutors support the faculty residents in providing personal assistance to undergraduates.

With the exception of the all-female McCormick Hall, Institute residence halls have coeducational living facilities. Although first-year students are not guaranteed an assignment to a particular residence hall or single-gender area, every effort is made to assign students to one of their top choices.

Student governing groups establish and administer many residence hall regulations and maintain acceptable standards of community behavior. Residential student governments also organize social, athletic, and intellectual programs for residence hall members. In each Institute residence hall, a tax determined by the residents is collected by MIT and made available to the residence hall government to help support such activities. Individual fraternity, sorority, and independent living group chapters have similar charges to support their extracurricular programs.

The Institute believes that it is to the great advantage of all new students to reside on campus—that is, to live in a residence hall. First-year undergraduates particularly gain from associations with upperclass students and participation in residential programs. Therefore, all first-year students are required to live in one of the undergraduate residence halls on campus for the duration of their first year. This excludes any fraternity, sorority, or independent living group housing. Exceptions to this requirement are rare and are made through a petition process reviewed by MIT Housing, the Office of the Vice President for Student Life, and the Office of Undergraduate Education.

Institute Houses (Undergraduate)

  • Baker House
  • Burton-Conner House
  • East Campus
  • MacGregor House
  • Maseeh Hall
  • McCormick Hall
  • New House—including New House 2, New House 3, New House 4, New House 5, Chocolate City, French House, German House, i-House, and Spanish House
  • Next House
  • Random Hall
  • Simmons Hall

Rooms in the Institute houses are engaged for the full academic year. For 2017–2018, the rents for the houses range from $3,720 to $5,325 per term. Rates typically increase 3.5% per year.

A student who cancels a room assignment after the deadline of June 15 will be charged a cancellation fee. A student who leaves MIT during a regular term will receive a refund based on proration of the term rental over 15 weeks of occupancy.

Fraternities, Sororities, and Independent Living Groups

Undergraduates affiliated with a fraternity, sorority, or independent living group have the option of residing in their FSILG facility after their freshman year. These houses are located in the cities of Cambridge, Boston, and Brookline, and are conveniently accessed by public or MIT transportation. Many FSILGs have their own meal plan, some are cook-for-yourself and others have chefs that cook for the entire group. In addition, members share responsibility for chapter house duties and work closely with alumni and the FSILG Office on the general maintenance and upkeep of the chapter facility. Room and board at FSILGs varies per term and is determined by each FSILG. Each FSILG hosts a live-in graduate residence advisor who serves as a mentor and support person for the group members in residence. With the exception of Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Sigma, and Pi Beta Phi, MIT Housing does not own or operate the FSILG chapter facilities. These houses are independently owned and operated by the individual alumni house corporations for each FSILG.

Additional Information

Additional information on undergraduate housing and application procedures is contained in The Guide to Residences and is updated every May. Additional information may be found on our website or by contacting the Housing Office, Room W59-200, 617-253-2811. Information about fraternities, sororities, and independent living groups also may be obtained on the FSILG website and by contacting the FSILG Office, Room W59-200, 617-253-7546.

Graduate Single Student Housing

Approximately 35 percent of MIT's single graduate students reside on campus in Avery Allen Ashdown House, Ping Yuan Tang Residence Hall, Harold Edgerton House, The Warehouse (NW30), Sidney-Pacific Residence Hall, and 70 Amherst Street. Students must be registered each term (not including the summer) in order to reside in on-campus student housing. MIT attempts to house all new graduate students who desire to live on campus. New single student assignments are for one year. Returning students who receive housing through the Continuing Student Allocation Process may remain in housing continuously until they graduate, as long as they are registered each term. Students sign a new license agreement each year they are in residence.

These residence halls provide a rich living environment in a number of different formats, including suites, kitchen suites, and apartments. All of the buildings have active student governments that plan and facilitate social and cultural events. All of the buildings have a faculty member in residence who, along with the house manager, support the students. All units are available as single sex. Mixed gender two-bedroom apartments in Edgerton House and Tang Hall, two-bedroom suites and apartments in Sidney-Pacific, and two- and three-bedroom suites and apartments in Ashdown are available upon request. All buildings except for Edgerton House are furnished.

The rent for all graduate residences is charged on a monthly basis and the licenses are from the date of occupancy until August 15 each year. Graduate Housing's strict termination policies can be found on the housing website. All rents include heat, hot water, electricity, internet, and basic cable, as well as all building amenities, such as low-cost laundry, gym facilities, and front desk services. Some residences have a $5–$6 monthly tax to cover residence hall social activities.

Rents for the 2017–2018 academic year range from $700 to $1,926 per month, per student. Rates typically increase 3.5% per year. Details about each of the residences can be found on the graduate and family housing website.

MIT graduate housing is assigned through an allocation process administered by the Housing Office. Students can enter the allocation for fall term housing between March and early May. Assignments are available in late May. A spring allocation takes place in November for spring term housing. Rooms that become available outside the allocation process are made available through a waiting list that runs from July through October and December through May. Details of the allocation and waiting list are available on the housing website.

The Housing Office, located in W59-200, can be reached at 617-253-5148.

Student Family Housing

Approximately 400 graduate and undergraduate families reside in MIT Family Housing. Family Housing is provided in the Eastgate Apartments, a high-rise apartment building, and the Westgate Apartments, which consist of a high-rise building and several garden-style buildings. Both communities have an active student government that plans and facilitates social and cultural events for the entire family. Apartments range from efficiencies to 2-bedroom apartments and are all unfurnished.

Residence in student family housing is limited to regular undergraduate and graduate students who are registered and attending MIT (on-campus) full time, and whose families reside together on a full-time basis, and to single parents with at least one child in residence. Except during the summer, students must be registered each term in order to reside in on-campus student housing. New graduate student assignments are either for one and a half or two years depending on the start date of the student's program, with a new license agreement signed each year. Married undergraduates or undergraduates with children may live in family housing during their eight semesters of guaranteed housing. Returning students who receive housing through the Continuing Student Allocation Process may remain in housing continuously until they graduate, as long as they are registered each term. They will also sign a new license agreement each year.

Eastgate and Westgate each have an MIT staff person in residence to provide active support to the community. Each building has a playground and Cambridge school buses stop at the buildings.

The rent for all family residences is charged on a monthly basis and the licenses are from the date of occupancy until August 15 each year. Family Housing's strict termination policies can be found on the housing website. All rents include heat, hot water, electricity, internet, and basic cable. Building amenities include low-cost laundry, playrooms, barbecues, and other common spaces.

Rents for the 2017–2018 academic year range from $1,403 to $2,075 per month, per apartment. Rates typically increase 3.5% per year. Details about each of the residences can be found on the graduate and family website.

Student family housing is managed by the Housing Office and is assigned through an allocation process. Students can enter the allocation for fall term housing between March and early May. Assignments are available in late May. A spring allocation takes place in November for spring term housing. Apartments that become available outside the allocation process are made available through a waiting list that runs from July through October and December through May. Details of the allocation and waiting list are available on the website.

The Housing Office, located in W59-200, can be reached at 617-253-5148.

Off-Campus Housing

Students who do not live on campus can consult the Off-Campus Housing Office, which maintains listings of available rentals in the greater Boston area. The staff provides students with resources for accommodations that suit individual preferences and finances, and advises and assists them during their tenancy if difficulties arise. Address correspondence to Off-Campus Housing Office, Room W59-200, 617-253-1493, or visit the website.