Anthropology (Course 21A)

The anthropology subjects described below are grouped within seven areas: Core Subjects; Culture and Identity; Global Health; Environment, Development, and Conflict; Science, Technology, and Media; Cross-cultural Dialog and Investigations; and Independent Study, Special Subjects, and Thesis.

Core Subjects

21A.00 Introduction to Anthropology: Comparing Human Cultures

Prereq: None
U (Fall)
3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Through the comparative study of different cultures, anthropology explores fundamental questions about what it means to be human. Seeks to understand how culture shapes societies, from the smallest island in the South Pacific to the largest Asian metropolis, and affects the way institutions work, from scientific laboratories to Christian mega-churches. Provides a framework for analyzing diverse facets of human experience, such as gender, ethnicity, language, politics, economics, and art.

G. Jones

21A.01 How Culture Works

Prereq: None
U (Spring)
3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Introduces diverse meanings and uses of the concept of culture with historical and contemporary examples from scholarship and popular media around the globe. Includes first-hand observations, synthesized histories and ethnographies, quantitative representations, and visual and fictionalized accounts of human experiences. Students conduct empirical research on cultural differences through the systematic observation of human interaction, employ methods of interpretative analysis, and practice convincing others of the accuracy of their findings.

M. Buyandelger

Culture and Identity

21A.103[J] The Science of Race, Sex, and Gender

Same subject as STS.046[J], WGS.225[J]
Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Spring)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

See description under subject WGS.225[J].

A. Sur

21A.104 Memory, Culture, and Forgetting

Subject meets with 21A.119
Prereq: None
U (Spring)
2-0-7 units. HASS-S

Introduces scholarly debates about the sociocultural practices through which individuals and societies create, sustain, recall, and erase memories. Emphasis is given to the history of knowledge, construction of memory, the role of authorities in shaping memory, and how societies decide on whose versions of memory are more "truthful" and "real." Other topics include how memory works in the human brain, memory and trauma, amnesia, memory practices in the sciences, false memory, sites of memory, and the commodification of memory. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

M. Buyandelger

21A.111[J] For Love and Money: Rethinking the Family

Same subject as WGS.172[J]
Prereq: None
U (Fall)
3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Cross-cultural case studies introduce students to the anthropological study of the social institutions and symbolic meanings of family, gender, and sexuality. Investigates the different forms families and households take and considers their social, emotional, and economic dynamics. Analyzes how various expectations for, and experiences of, family life are rooted in or challenged by particular conceptions of gender and sexuality. Addresses questions surrounding what it means to be a "man" or a "woman," as well as a family member, in different social contexts.

H. Paxson

21A.119 Memory, Culture, and Forgetting

Subject meets with 21A.104
Prereq: None
G (Spring)
3-0-9 units

Introduces scholarly debates about the sociocultural practices through which individuals and societies create, sustain, recall, and erase memories. Emphasis is given to the history of knowledge, construction of memory, the role of authorities in shaping memory, and how societies decide on whose versions of memory are more "truthful" and "real." Other topics include how memory works in the human brain, memory and trauma, amnesia, memory practices in the sciences, false memory, sites of memory, and the commodification of memory. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

M. Buyandelger

21A.120 American Dream: Exploring Class in the US

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: U (Spring)
Acad Year 2018-2019: Not offered

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Explores the experiences and understandings of class among Americans positioned at different points along the US social spectrum. Considers a variety of classic frameworks for analyzing social class and uses memoirs, novels and ethnographies to gain a sense of how class is experienced in daily life and how it intersects with other forms of social difference such as race and gender.

C. Walley

21A.130[J] Introduction to Latin American Studies

Same subject as 17.55[J], 21G.084[J], 21H.170[J]
Prereq: None
U (Spring)
3-0-9 units. HASS-S; CI-H

See description under subject 17.55[J].

T. Padilla, P. Duong

21A.140[J] Cultures of East Asia

Same subject as 21G.047[J]
Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Fall)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Explores diverse cultures, everyday experiences, and political economies in East Asian countries, such as China, Japan, Korea, and Singapore, with additional examples from the surrounding regions. Examines the different ways people in these regions experience and understand globalization, as well as the changing structures of kinship and family, work and organizational culture, media, consumption, and the role of government. Readings cover ethnographic studies of the world's largest seafood market in Tokyo, the effect of the Asian financial crisis on South Korea, the role of science in formulating China's one child policy and its economic and social implications, and the state and ethnic diversity in Singapore.

M. Buyandelger

21A.141[J] Images of Asian Women: Dragon Ladies and Lotus Blossoms

Same subject as 21G.048[J], WGS.274[J]
Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Spring)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Explores some of the forces and mechanisms through which stereotypes are built and perpetuated. In particular, examines stereotypes associated with Asian women in colonial, nationalist, state-authoritarian, and global/diasporic narratives about gender and power. Students read ethnography, fiction, and history, and view films to examine the politics and circumstances that create and perpetuate the representation of Asian women as dragon ladies, lotus blossoms, despotic tyrants, desexualized servants, and docile subordinates. Students are introduced to debates about Orientalism, gender, and power.

M. Buyandelger

21A.143[J] Gender and Japanese Popular Culture

Same subject as 21G.039[J], WGS.154[J]
Subject meets with 21G.591

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: U (Spring)
Acad Year 2018-2019: Not offered

3-0-9 units. HASS-H

See description under subject 21G.039[J].

I. Condry

21A.150 Teaching and Learning: Cross-Cultural Perspectives

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Spring)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Explores the diverse ways that people teach and learn in different countries, disciplines, and subcultures (computer gamers, magicians, jazz musicians, etc.). Compares schooling to other forms of knowledge transmission, from initiation and apprenticeship to recent innovations in online education. Students discuss various learning theories and apply them to a variety of in-class activities using qualitative methods to conduct original research on topics of their choice.Limited to 15.

G. Jones

21A.155 Food, Culture, and Politics

Prereq: None
U (Spring)
3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Explores connections between what we eat and who we are through cross-cultural study of how personal identities and social groups are formed via food production, preparation, and consumption. Organized around critical discussion of what makes "good" food good (healthy, authentic, ethical, etc.). Uses anthropological and literary classics as well as recent writing and films on the politics of food and agriculture. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication provided.

H. Paxson

21A.156 Introduction to Sociology

Prereq: None
U (Spring)
3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Explores how social and historical structures shape individual experience and organize patterns of behavior. Focuses on the major social structures of contemporary society, such as family, government, work and organizations, religion, popular culture and mass media, criminal justice and the law, racial and ethnic group membership, community geography, and education.

L. Tso

21A.157 The Meaning of Life

Prereq: None
U (Spring)
3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Examines how a variety of cultural traditions propose answers to the question of how to live a meaningful life. Considers the meaning of life, not as a philosophical abstraction, but as a question that individuals grapple with in their daily lives, facing difficult decisions between meeting and defying cultural expectations. Provides tools for thinking about moral decisions as social and historical practices, and permits students to compare and contextualize the ways people in different times and places approach fundamental ethical concerns.

S. Helmreich, H. Paxson

Global Health

21A.300 Practicum in Global Health and Development

Subject meets with 21A.329
Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Spring)

3-3-6 units. HASS-S

Provides training for students to critically analyze the relationship between "health" and "development." Draws upon the theory and methods of medical anthropology, social medicine, public health, and development to track how culture, history, and political economy influence health and disease in global communities. Students work in teams to formulate research questions, and collect and analyze qualitative data in clinical and community settings in the greater Boston area, in order to design effective development interventions aimed at reducing health disparities in the US and abroad. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

E. C. James

21A.301 Disease and Health: Culture, Society, and Ethics

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Fall)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

From a cross cultural and global perspective, examines how medicine is practiced, with particular emphasis on biomedicine. Analyzes medical practice as a cultural system, focusing on the human and social side of things. Considers how people in different societies think of disease, health, body, and mind.Enrollment limited.

A. Moran-Thomas

21A.302[J] Dilemmas in Biomedical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good?

Same subject as WGS.271[J]
Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Fall)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

An introduction to the cross-cultural study of biomedical ethics. Examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western biomedicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation and other issues. Evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. Discusses critiques of the biomedical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.

E. C. James

21A.303[J] The Anthropology of Biology

Same subject as STS.060[J]
Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Fall)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Applies the tools of anthropology to examine biology in the age of genomics, biotechnological enterprise, biodiversity conservation, pharmaceutical bioprospecting, and synthetic biology. Examines such social concerns such as bioterrorism, genetic modification, and cloning. Offers an anthropological inquiry into how the substances and explanations of biology — ecological, organismic, cellular, molecular, genetic, informatic — are changing. Examines such artifacts as cell lines, biodiversity databases, and artificial life models, and using primary sources in biology, social studies of the life sciences, and literary and cinematic materials, asks how we might answer Erwin Schrodinger's 1944 question, "What Is Life?", today.

S. Helmreich

21A.305[J] Drugs, Politics, and Culture

Same subject as STS.062[J]
Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Fall)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Explores the relationship between drugs and society in a cross-cultural perspective, looking at intersections between drugs and phenomena such as poverty, religion, technology, colonialism, conflict, and global capitalism. Examines histories behind the use and abuse of various substances, including opium, cocaine, and prescription pharmaceuticals. Considers why different societies prohibit and sanction different drugs; the politics of markets and clinical trials; and how social conditions affect the circulation of medicines in global health.Limited to 25.

A. Moran-Thomas

21A.306 Culture, Embodiment, and the Senses

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Fall)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Examines historical and cross-cultural debates about the relationship between mind, brain, emotion, and behavior; memory and recall; sensory experience; and illness and healing. Assesses cultural traditions that challenge scientific interpretations of experience arising from western philosophical and physiological models. Explores how experience itself is culturally mediated, interpreted, and elaborated within symbolic, political, and other fields.

E. C. James

21A.308 Global Mental Health

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Fall)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S; CI-H

Provides skills to critically analyze issues of mental health in historical and cross-cultural contexts. Studies mental illness as a complex biopsychosocial experience embedded in particular political and economic frameworks. Examines the relationships among culture, gender, embodiment, and emotional distress; power inequalities and ideas of the "normal" and "abnormal;" and how such conceptions influence caregiving practices, whether in traditional or biomedical contexts. Evaluates how the disciplines of psychology, psychoanalysis, and psychiatry have developed in the West, and considers their influence on mental health interventions in global settings.Limited to 25.

E. James

21A.310[J] Global Sexualities

Same subject as WGS.155[J]
Prereq: None
U (Fall)
3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Connects the consequences of power, inequality, and belief systems on sexual health and personal well-being in the US and non-western countries. Focuses on how "subordinate" groups contend with dominant domestic and international pressures to conform to narratives and expectations predicated on inequalities. Conducted in seminar format with discussions on uncovering the dynamics and dimensions of inequality. Examines major historical cross-cultural events impacting attitudes on sexual behaviors and sexualities.

L. Tso

21A.319[J] History and Anthropology of Medicine and Biology

Same subject as STS.330[J]
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Spring)

3-0-9 units

Explores recent historical and anthropological approaches to the study of medicine and biology. Topics might include interaction of disease and society; science, colonialism, and international health; impact of new technologies on medicine and the life sciences; neuroscience and psychiatry; race, biology and medicine. Specific emphasis varies from year to year.

S. Helmreich

21A.329 Practicum in Global Health and Development

Subject meets with 21A.300
Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Spring)

3-3-6 units

Provides training for students to critically analyze the relationship between "health" and "development." Draws upon the theory and methods of medical anthropology, social medicine, public health, and development to track how culture, history, and political economy influence health and disease in global communities. Students work in teams to formulate research questions, and collect and analyze qualitative data in clinical and community settings in the greater Boston area, in order to design effective development interventions aimed at reducing health disparities in the US and abroad. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

E. C. James

21A.331[J] Infections and Inequalities: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Global Health

Same subject as 7.331[J], HST.431[J]
Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Spring)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Examines case studies in infectious disease outbreaks to demonstrate how human health is a product of multiple determinants, such as biology, sociocultural and historical factors, politics, economic processes, and the environment. Analyzes how structural inequalities render certain populations vulnerable to illness and explores the moral and ethical dimensions of public health and clinical interventions to promote health.Limited to 25.

E. James, D. Kim, A. Chakraborty

Environment, Development, and Conflict

21A.400 The Stakes of International Development

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Spring)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S; CI-H

Offers an anthropological perspective on international development. Students consider development, not in policy or technical terms, but through its social and political dynamics and its impacts on daily life. Examines the various histories of, and meanings given to, international development as well as the social organization of aid agencies and projects. Follows examples of specific projects in various parts of the world. Examples: water projects for pastorialists in Africa, factory development in Southeast Asia, and international nature parks in Indonesia.Enrollment limited.

C. Walley

21A.409[J] Ethics of Intervention

Same subject as 11.238[J]
Prereq: Permission of instructor
G (Fall)
3-0-9 units

See description under subject 11.238[J].

E. C. James

21A.410 Environmental Struggles

Prereq: None
U (Spring)
3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Offers an international perspective on the environment. Using environmental conflict to consider the stakes that groups in various parts of the world have in nature, while also exploring how ecological and social dynamics interact and change over time, subject considers such controversial environmental issues as: nuclear contamination in Eastern Europe; genetic bioprospecting in Mexico; toxic run-off in the rural US; the Bhopal accident in India; and the impact of population growth in the Third World.

C. Walley

21A.411[J] People and Other Animals

Same subject as 21H.380[J]
Subject meets with 21A.419[J], 21H.980[J]

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Fall)

2-0-10 units. HASS-S

See description under subject 21H.380[J].

H. Ritvo

21A.415[J] Energy Decisions, Markets, and Policies

Same subject as 11.161[J], 14.43[J], 15.031[J], 17.397[J]
Prereq: 14.01, 15.0111, or permission of instructor
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Fall)

4-0-8 units. HASS-S

See description under subject 15.031[J].

C. Warshaw

21A.419[J] People and Other Animals

Same subject as 21H.980[J]
Subject meets with 21A.411[J], 21H.380[J]

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Fall)

2-0-10 units

See description under subject 21H.980[J].

H. Ritvo

21A.429[J] Environmental Conflict

Same subject as STS.320[J]
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Fall)

3-0-9 units

Explores the complex interrelationships among humans and natural environments, focusing on non-western parts of the world in addition to Europe and the United States. Use of environmental conflict to draw attention to competing understandings and uses of "nature" as well as the local, national and transnational power relationships in which environmental interactions are embedded. In addition to utilizing a range of theoretical perspectives, subject draws upon a series of ethnographic case studies of environmental conflicts in various parts of the world.

C. Walley

21A.442[J] Violence, Human Rights, and Justice

Same subject as WGS.270[J]
Prereq: None
U (Spring)
3-0-9 units. HASS-S

An examination of the problem of mass violence and oppression in the contemporary world, and of the concept of human rights as a defense against such abuse. Explores questions of cultural relativism, race, gender and ethnicity. Examines case studies from war crimes tribunals, truth commissions, anti-terrorist policies and other judicial attempts to redress state-sponsored wrongs. Considers whether the human rights framework effectively promotes the rule of law in modern societies. Students debate moral positions and address ideas of moral relativism.

E. C. James

21A.461 What Is Capitalism?

Prereq: None
U (Fall)
3-0-9 units. HASS-S; CI-H

Introduces academic debates on the nature of capitalism, drawing upon the ideas of scholars as diverse as Adam Smith and Karl Marx. Examines anthropological studies of how contemporary capitalism plays out in people's daily lives in a range of geographic and social settings, and implications for how we understand capitalism today. Settings range from Wall Street investment banks to auto assembly plants, from family businesses to consumer shopping malls.Enrollment limited.

C. Walley

Science, Technology, and Media

21A.500[J] Technology and Culture

Same subject as STS.075[J]
Prereq: None
U (Fall)
2-0-7 units. HASS-S

Examines the intersections of technology, culture, and politics in a variety of social and historical settings ranging from 19th-century factories to 21st-century techno dance floors, from Victorian London to anything-goes Las Vegas. Discussions and readings organized around three questions: what cultural effects and risks follow from treating biology as technology; how computers have changed the way we think about ourselves and others; and how politics are built into our infrastructures. Explores the forces behind technological and cultural change; how technological and cultural artifacts are understood and used by different communities; and whether, in what ways, and for whom technology has produced a better world.Limited to 40.

S. Helmreich

21A.501[J] Art, Craft, Science

Same subject as STS.074[J]
Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Spring)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S
Credit cannot also be received for 21A.509[J], STS.474[J]

Examines how people learn, practice, and evaluate traditional and contemporary craft techniques. Social science theories of design, embodiment, apprenticeship learning, skill, labor, expertise, and tacit knowledge are used to explore distinctions among art, craft, and science. Also discusses the commoditization of craft into market goods, collectible art, and tourism industries. Ethnographic and historical case studies include textiles, Shaker furniture, glassblowing, quilting, cheesemaking, industrial design, home and professional cooking, factory and laboratory work, CAD/CAM. Demonstrations, optional field trips, and/or hands-on craft projects may be included. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

H. Paxson

21A.502 Fun and Games: Cross-Cultural Perspectives

Prereq: None
U (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Considers the cultural organization of play in different communities and societies. Explores why all people play, how different cultures experience fun, and what particular games mean, if anything. Surveys major theories of play in relation to a variety of play phenomena, such as jokes, video games, children's fantasies, sports, and entertainment spectacles. As a final project, students develop their own case study.

G. Jones

21A.503[J] Language and Technology

Same subject as 24.913[J], STS.070[J]
Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Fall)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Examines cultural impact of communication technologies, from basic literacy to cell phones, and computer-based social networks on patterns of verbal interaction. Introduces theories and methods of linguistic anthropology pertinent to technologies that make it possible for people to communicate across distances in space and time. Students develop their own research projects exploring the cultural dimensions of technologically enhanced communication.

G. Jones

21A.504[J] Cultures of Computing

Same subject as STS.086[J], WGS.276[J]
Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Spring)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Examines computers anthropologically, as artifacts revealing the social orders and cultural practices that create them. Students read classic texts in computer science along with cultural analyses of computing history and contemporary configurations. Explores the history of automata, automation and capitalist manufacturing; cybernetics and WWII operations research; artificial intelligence and gendered subjectivity; robots, cyborgs, and artificial life; creation and commoditization of the personal computer; the growth of the Internet as a military, academic, and commercial project; hackers and gamers; technobodies and virtual sociality. Emphasis is placed on how ideas about gender and other social differences shape labor practices, models of cognition, hacking culture, and social media.

Staff

21A.505[J] The Anthropology of Sound

Same subject as STS.065[J]
Prereq: None
U (Spring)
Not offered regularly; consult department

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Examines the ways humans experience sound and how perceptions and technologies of sound emerge from cultural, economic, and historical worlds. Consider how the sound/noise boundary has been imagined, created, and modeled across sociocultural and scientific contexts. Learn how environmental, linguistic, and musical sounds are construed cross-culturally as well as the rise of telephony, architectural acoustics, sound recording, and the globalized travel of these technologies. Questions of sound ownership, property, authorship, and copyright in the digital age are also addressed.

S. Helmreich

21A.506 The Anthropology of Politics

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Fall)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Examines the birth and international expansion of an American industry of political marketing. Focuses attention on the cultural processes, sociopolitical contexts and moral utopias that shape the practice of political marketing in the US and in different countries. By looking at the debates and expert practices at the core of the business of politics, explores how the "universal" concept of democracy is interpreted and reworked through space and time. Examines how different cultural groups experimenting with political marketing understand the role of citizens in a democracy.

M. Vidart-Delgado

21A.507[J] Resonance: Sonic Experience, Science, and Art

Same subject as 4.648[J]
Subject meets with 4.649[J], 21A.519[J]

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Fall)

3-0-9 units. HASS-A

See description under subject 4.648[J].

S. Helmreich, C. Jones

21A.508 Anthropology through Speculative Fiction (21A.203)

Prereq: None
U (Fall)
Not offered regularly; consult department

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Examines how anthropology and speculative fiction (SF) each explore ideas about culture and society, technology, morality, and life in "other" worlds. Investigates this convergence of interest through analysis of SF in print, film, and other media. Covers traditional and contemporary anthropological themes, including first contact; gift exchange; gender, marriage, and kinship; law, morality, and cultural relativism; religion; race and embodiment; politics, violence, and war; medicine, healing, and consciousness; technology and environment.

E. C. James, S. Helmreich

21A.509[J] Art, Craft, Science

Same subject as STS.474[J]
Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Spring)

3-0-9 units
Credit cannot also be received for 21A.501[J], STS.074[J]

Examines how people learn, practice, and evaluate traditional and contemporary craft techniques. Social science theories of design, embodiment, apprenticeship learning, skill, labor, expertise, and tacit knowledge are used to explore distinctions among art, craft, and science. Also discusses the commoditization of craft into market goods, collectible art, and tourism industries. Ethnographic and historical case studies include textiles, Shaker furniture, glassblowing, quilting, cheesemaking, industrial design, home and professional cooking, factory and laboratory work, CAD/CAM. Demonstrations, optional field trips, and/or hands-on craft projects may be included. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

H. Paxson

21A.519[J] Resonance: Sonic Experience, Science, and Art

Same subject as 4.649[J]
Subject meets with 4.648[J], 21A.507[J]

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Fall)

3-0-9 units

See description under subject 4.649[J].

S. Helmreich, C. Jones

21A.520 Magic, Science, and Religion (21A.200)

Prereq: None
U (Fall)
3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Explores the origins of magic, science, and religion as forms of belief within and across cultures. Addresses the place of rationality and belief in competing sociocultural theories, with a focus on analyzing modern perspectives. Examines how cases of overlap between magic, science, and religion raise new questions about modernity and human nature.

G. Jones

21A.550[J] DV Lab: Documenting Science through Video and New Media

Same subject as STS.064[J]
Subject meets with 21A.559

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Spring)

3-3-12 units. HASS-A; CI-H

Uses documentary video making as a tool to explore everyday social worlds (including those of science and engineering), and for thinking analytically about media itself. Students make videos and engage in critical analysis. Provides students with instruction on how to communicate effectively and creatively in a visual medium, and how to articulate their own analyses of documentary images in writing and spoken word. Readings drawn from documentary film theory, anthropology, and social studies of science. Students view a wide variety of classic documentaries and explore different styles. Lab component devoted to digital video production. Includes a final video project. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.Limited to 12.

C. Walley, C. Boebel

21A.551[J] Advanced DV Lab: Documenting Science through Video and New Media

Same subject as STS.068[J]
Prereq: 21A.550[J] or permission of instructor
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Spring)

3-3-6 units. HASS-A

Advanced exploration of documentary film theory and production that offers a social scientific perspective on documentaries about science, engineering, and related fields. Student work focuses on final digital video projects. Discussion and readings tailored to the questions and issues raised by specific student projects; labs focus on the technical skills required to complete more advanced work.Enrollment limited.

C. Walley, C. Boebel

21A.559 DV Lab: Documenting Science through Video and New Media

Subject meets with 21A.550[J], STS.064[J]
Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Spring)

3-3-12 units

Uses documentary video making as a tool to explore everyday social worlds (including those of science and engineering), and for thinking analytically about media itself. Students make videos and engage in critical analysis. Provides students with instruction on how to communicate effectively and creatively in a visual medium, and how to articulate their own analyses of documentary images in writing and spoken word. Readings drawn from documentary film theory, anthropology, and social studies of science. Students view a wide variety of classic documentaries and explore different styles. Lab component devoted to digital video production. Includes a final video project. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.Limited to 12.

C. Walley, C. Boebel

Cross-cultural Dialog and Investigations

21A.801[J] Cross-Cultural Investigations: Technology and Development

Same subject as EC.702[J], STS.071[J]
Subject meets with EC.792[J], 21A.839[J], STS.481[J]

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Spring)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Enhances cross-cultural understanding through discussion of practical, ethical, and epistemological issues in conducting social science and applied research in foreign countries or unfamiliar communities. Includes research practicum to help students develop interviewing, participant-observation, and other qualitative research skills, as well as critical discussion of case studies. Open to all interested students, but intended particularly for those planning to undertake exploratory research or applied work abroad. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

C. Walley

21A.802 Seminar in Ethnography and Fieldwork

Prereq: Permission of instructor
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: U (Spring)

3-0-9 units. HASS-S

Introduction to ethnographic practices: the study of and communicating about culture. Subject provides instruction and practice in writing, revision of fieldnotes, and a final paper.Preference to Anthropology majors and minors.

Staff

21A.809 Designing Empirical Research in the Social Sciences

Prereq: Permission of instructor
G (Spring)
3-0-9 units

Foundations of good empirical research in the social sciences. Introduction to the basic assumptions and underlying logic of both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Explores a variety of approaches to research design, evaluates the products of empirical research, and practices several common techniques. Discusses several major theoretical paradigms used as interpretive frameworks for social science research. Students develop a proposal for their own research project.

S. Silbey

21A.819 Qualitative Research Methods

Prereq: Permission of instructor
G (Fall)
3-6-3 units

Training in the design and practice of qualitative research. Organized around illustrative texts, class exercises, and student projects. Topics include the process of gaining access to and participating in the social worlds of others; techniques of observation, fieldnote-taking, researcher self-monitoring and reflection; methods of inductive analysis of qualitative data including conceptual coding, grounded theory, and narrative analysis. Discussion of research ethics, the politics of fieldwork, modes of validating researcher accounts, and styles of writing up qualitative field research.

S. Silbey

21A.829[J] Ethnography

Same subject as STS.360[J]
Prereq: Permission of instructor; Coreq: 21A.859[J]
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Fall)

3-0-9 units

See description under subject STS.360[J].Preference to HASTS, CMS, HTC and Sloan graduate students.

M. Fischer

21A.839[J] Cross-Cultural Investigations: Technology and Development

Same subject as EC.792[J], STS.481[J]
Subject meets with EC.702[J], 21A.801[J], STS.071[J]

Prereq: None
Acad Year 2017-2018: Not offered
Acad Year 2018-2019: G (Spring)

3-0-9 units

Enhances cross-cultural understanding through discussion of practical, ethical, and epistemological issues in conducting social science and applied research in foreign countries or unfamiliar communities. Includes research practicum to help students develop interviewing, participant-observation, and other qualitative research skills, as well as critical discussion of case studies. Open to all interested students, but intended particularly for those planning to undertake exploratory research or applied work abroad. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

C. Walley

21A.859[J] Social Theory and Analysis

Same subject as STS.250[J]
Prereq: None
G (Fall)
3-0-9 units

Major theorists and theoretical schools since the late 19th century. Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Bourdieu, Levi-Strauss, Geertz, Foucault, Gramsci, and others. Key terms, concepts, and debates.

M. Fischer

Independent Study, Special Subjects, and Thesis

21A.901 Independent Study in Anthropology

Prereq: Two subjects in Anthropology
U (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer)
Units arranged
Can be repeated for credit.

Opportunity for independent study, guided research, practicum, or field work under regular supervision by a faculty member. Projects require prior approval of the instructor and Head of the Anthropology Program. Normal maximum is 6 units; exceptional 9- or 12-unit projects occasionally approved.

Consult Program Head

21A.902 Independent Study in Anthropology

Prereq: Two subjects in Anthropology
U (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer)
Units arranged
Can be repeated for credit.

Opportunity for independent study, guided research, practicum, or field work under regular supervision by a faculty member. Projects require prior approval of the instructor and Head of the Anthropology Program. Normal maximum is 6 units; exceptional 9- or 12-unit projects occasionally approved.

Consult Program Head

21A.929 Graduate Independent Study

Prereq: None
G (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer)
Units arranged
Can be repeated for credit.

Opportunity for study or projects at an advanced level with an Anthropology faculty member.

Consult Program Head

21A.939 Graduate Independent Study

Prereq: None
G (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer)
Units arranged
Can be repeated for credit.

Opportunity for study or projects at an advanced level with an Anthropology faculty member.

Consult Program Head

21A.949 Graduate Independent Study

Prereq: None
G (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer)
Units arranged
Can be repeated for credit.

Opportunity for study or projects at an advanced level with an Anthropology faculty member.

Consult Program Head

21A.950 Teaching Anthropology

Prereq: None
G (Fall, Spring)
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Can be repeated for credit.

For qualified graduate students serving as either a teaching assistant or instructor for subjects in Anthropology.Enrollment limited by availability of suitable teaching assignments.

Staff

21A.S01-21A.S02 Special Subject in Anthropology

Prereq: None
U (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer)
Units arranged

Seminar or lecture on a topic in anthropology that is not covered in the regular curriculum.

Staff

21A.S10-21A.S11 Special Graduate Subject in Anthropology

Prereq: None
G (Fall, IAP, Summer)
Units arranged

Seminar or lecture on a topic in anthropology that is not covered in the regular curriculum.

Staff

21A.THT Anthropology Pre-Thesis Tutorial

Prereq: None
U (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer)
Units arranged
Can be repeated for credit.

Students writing a thesis work with an advisor to develop research topics, review relevant research and scholarship, frame research questions, choose an appropriate methodology for data collection and analysis, and draft the introductory and methodology sections of their theses. Includes substantial practice in writing (with revision) and oral presentations.

Consult Program Head

21A.THU Undergraduate Thesis in Anthropology

Prereq: 21A.THT
U (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer)
Units arranged
Can be repeated for credit.

Completion of work on the senior major thesis under supervision of a faculty thesis advisor. Includes oral presentation of thesis progress early in the term, assembling and revising the final text, and a final meeting with a committee of faculty evaluators to discuss the successes and limitations of the project.

Staff

21A.UR Undergraduate Research

Prereq: None
U (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer)
Units arranged [P/D/F]
Can be repeated for credit.

Individual participation in an ongoing research project. For students in the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program.

Staff

21A.URG Undergraduate Research

Prereq: None
U (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer)
Units arranged
Can be repeated for credit.

Individual participation in an ongoing research project. For students in the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program.

Staff