Military Science (MS)

ROTC subjects do not carry academic credit at MIT, but they can be counted toward the PE requirement. Up to two points per year with a maximum of four points.

Military Science

MS.101 Introduction to the Army and Critical Thinking

Prereq: None. Coreq: MS.102
U (Fall, Spring)
1-3-2 units

Introduces students to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership and communication. Explores how the personal development of cultural understanding, goal setting, time management, stress management and comprehensive fitness relate to leadership, officership, and the Army profession.

J. Davis, T. Perkins

MS.102 Introduction to the Profession of Arms

Prereq: None. Coreq: MS.101
U (Fall, Spring)
1-0-2 units

Introduces students to the professional challenges and competencies that are needed for effective execution of the profession of arms and Army communication. Explores how Army ethics and values shape the Army and the specific ways they are inculcated into Army culture. Investigates the Army leadership dimensions, attributes, and core competencies and gain practical experience using critical communication skills.

J. Davis, T. Perkins

MS.110 American Military History

Prereq: None
U (Fall, Spring)
2-0-4 units

Develops an understanding of the effects the US military and American society have on each other through thematic exploration of American military history in the context of broader US history, and military strategy and global involvement. Through readings, oral and written presentations, and exams, students describe the role of the US military, its evolution, and its impact on society and technology; and critically analyze an armed conflict using the principles of war.

S. McDonough

MS.201 Leadership and Decision Making

Prereq: MS.102 or permission of instructor
U (Fall)
2-3-1 units

Familiarizes students with the professional practice of ethics within the Army by exploring Army values and ethics along with the fundamentals of leadership, personal development, and tactics at the small unit level. Explores ethical and tactical decision-making case studies. Students required to demonstrate writing skills and present information briefings as preparation for development in becoming successful future officers.

M. Sim, C. Salmon

MS.202 Army Doctrine and Team Development

Prereq: MS.201 or permission of instructor
U (Spring)
2-3-1 units

Students practice and apply fundamentals of Army leadership, officership, Army values and ethics, personal development, and small unit tactics at the squad level. Provides systematic and specific feedback on individual leader attributes, values, and core leader competencies. Students demonstrate writing skills and present information briefings as preparation for development in becoming successful future officers.

M. Sim, C. Salmon, D. Brown

MS.301 Applied Team Leadership

Prereq: MS.202 or permission of instructor
U (Fall)
3-6-3 units

Develops student proficiency in planning and executing complex operations, functioning as a leader of small and medium sized teams, assessing operational environments, accepting prudent risk, and leading fellow students. Through assignment to leadership positions in the ROTC Battalion, students are directly responsible for the training, development, and well-being of underclass students assigned to their charge. Students plan scenario based missions at the squad level using troop leading procedures and combat orders, enhancing their oral and written communications, creative thinking, and problem solving skills.

E. Hannenberg, M. Pollak

MS.302 Applied Leadership in Small Unit Operations

Prereq: MS.301 or permission of instructor
U (Spring)
3-6-3 units

Familiarizes students with group dynamics and how personal identity influences leadership. Students explore bases of power, influence tactics, and leadership self-assessments. Through assignment to leadership positions in the ROTC Battalion, students are responsible for the training, development, and well-being of underclass students. Students experiment with counseling, receive peer feedback, and explore elements of the Army Profession. Students build competence with the basics of maneuvering a platoon, the principles of patrolling including raids, recons, and ambushes.

E. Hannenberg, M. Pollak

MS.401 Officership: Mission Command and the Army Officer

Prereq: MS.302
U (Fall)
3-6-3 units

Develops proficiency in planning and executing complex operations, functioning as a member of an organizational staff, assessing risk, making ethical decisions, and leading fellow students. Through assignment to leadership positions in the ROTC Battalion, students plan and lead the execution of labs, directing and controlling the corps of cadets, enhancing their oral and written communications, and improving their application of troop-leading procedures and problem solving.

P. Godfrin

MS.402 Officership: Mission Command and Company Grade Leadership

Prereq: MS.401
U (Spring)
3-6-3 units

Examines the US National Security Structure and how the Army operates as part of the joint force in a whole of government approach. Studies how various operational variables affect military operations. Through assignment to leadership positions, students actively plan and execute training within the program, direct and control an organization, enhance oral and written communications, and apply troop-leading procedures. Students also examine past leaders through a staff ride to the battlefields of Lexington and Concord.

P. Godfrin