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8.06 Quantum Physics III

Prereq: 8.05
U (Spring)
12 Units

Continuation of 8.05. Units: natural units, scales of microscopic phenomena, applications. Time-independent approximation methods: degenerate and nondegenerate perturbation theory, variational method, Born-Oppenheimer approximation, applications to atomic and molecular systems. The structure of one- and two-electron atoms: overview, spin-orbit and relativistic corrections, fine structure, variational approximation, screening, Zeeman and Stark effects. Charged particles in a magnetic field: Landau levels and integer quantum hall effect. Scattering: general principles, partial waves, review of one-dimension, low-energy approximations, resonance, Born approximation. Time-dependent perturbation theory. Students research and write a paper on a topic related to the content of 8.05 and 8.06.

Staff

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Subjects

http://catalog.mit.edu/subjects/

...GIR) 8.01 , 8.01L , 8.011 , 8...03 , 7.05 , 7.06 , or 7.28...

Subjects

http://catalog.mit.edu/summer/subjects/

...GIR) 8.01 , 8.01L , 8.011 , 8...03 , 7.05 , 7.06 , or 7.28...

Mathematics (Course 18)

http://catalog.mit.edu/degree-charts/mathematics-course-18/

...Option A and one of the following: 8.06 Quantum Physics III 14.33 Research...

Mathematical Economics (Course 14-2)

http://catalog.mit.edu/degree-charts/mathematical-economics-course-14-2/

...fulfill the Communication Requirement. 8 Restricted Electives in...18.03 or 18.06 in the Departmental...

Computer Science, Economics, and Data Science (Course 6-14)

http://catalog.mit.edu/degree-charts/computer-science-economics-data-science-course-6-14/

...fulfill the Communication Requirement. 8 Restricted Electives in...042[J] and 18.06 in the Departmental...

Mathematics with Computer Science (Course 18-C)

http://catalog.mit.edu/degree-charts/mathematics-computer-science-course-18-c/

...fulfill the Communication Requirement. 8 Restricted Electives in...18.03 or 18.06 and 18.062...

Department of Physics

http://catalog.mit.edu/schools/science/physics/

The Department of Physics offers undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate training, with a wide range of options for specialization. The emphasis of both the undergraduate curriculum and the graduate program is on understanding the fundamental principles that appear to govern the behavior of the physical world, including space and time and matter and energy in all its forms, from the subatomic to the cosmological and from the elementary to the complex. The Department of Physics strives to be at the forefront of many areas where new physics can be found. Consequently, the department works on problems where extreme conditions may reveal new behavior: from clusters of galaxies or the entire universe to elementary particles or the strings that may be the substructure of these particles; from collisions of nuclei at relativistic velocities that make droplets of matter hotter than anything since the Big Bang to laser-cooled atoms so cold that their wave functions overlap, resulting in a macroscopic collective state, the Bose-Einstein condensate; and from individual atoms to unusual materials, such as high-temperature superconductors and those that are important in biology. Pushing the limits provides the opportunity to observe new general principles and test theories of the structure and behavior of matter and energy.